Wilde Walk by Anne Gaelan

Cafe Royal Interior

The astounding Oscar Wilde lounge in the Café Royal

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The ceiling of the Oscar Wilde lounge, The Cafe Royal London

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Oscar’s table!

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Poet at the Cafe Royal

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Mr Neil Titley read as Wilde in excerpts of his first trial. Mr Darcy Sullivan played Carson.

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Prince’s Hall, Piccadilly, venue of Wilde’s first UK lecture.

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Site of Wilde’s publisher, John Lane

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Lane’s nephew Allen founded Penguin books.

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St James’ Place where Wilde entertained young men.

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Number 10 and 11 were one residence in Wilde’s day.

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The musician who is so significant in Wilde’s work.

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What is left of the theatre that produced Lady Windermere’s fan. The plaque is of Dorian Gray.

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The Society walk ended here at Theatre Royal Haymarket.

Oscar Wilde’s West End Walk for members of The Oscar Wilde Society started at the Café Royal.

The day was Saturday 29th September 2018.

Enjoy some of our experience.  Even better, join The Oscar Wilde Society.

Just click the link to find out more.

 

Gyles Brandreth President of The Oscar Wilde Society in Conversation with Poet

Oscar was a sailor!

Here is a fabulous update from Mr John Cooper.

Sailing was a large part of Wilde’s summer holiday in 1882!  He enjoyed a large amount of time, (several days) on Robert Rossevelt’s yacht “Heart’s Ease.”

It is a name very much appropriate to  both writers Arthur and Oscar!

It is also absolutely brilliant to know that another writer  connects Ransome to Wilde!

Thank you Mr John Cooper for sharing your information with Poet Speak!

WordPress does after all, connect people from round the world!

 

 

 

 

Mr Gyles Brandreth, wit, novelist and President of The Oscar Wilde Society in conversation with Poet at The Platform in Morecambe before his current show
Break a Leg.

See http://oscarwildesociety.co.uk/

http://www.arthur-ransome.org.uk/

https://oscarwildeinamerica.blog

http://www.oscarwildeinamerica.org/quotations/nothing-to-declare.html.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oscar Wilde’s Garden of Eros, the Movie

 

 

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Here is the exquisite Miss G, who will take the lead role in the film of Wilde’s Garden of Eros.

2018 is the perfect year for a female lead as it is the centenary of women asserting themselves and gaining the vote in the UK!

As you see, Miss G is the perfect choice for a Wilde heroine, combining the beauty of youth with rustic romanticism.

Enjoy the slides as we prepare for the film.

Next week – Hello, Mr President!

For the author’s work click the link.

 

 

Sailing, Seaside and the Lake Country: This is England.

Blow the man down!

 

 

Arthur Ransome and Oscar Wilde had a love of sailing and the sea.

Here are related photos of Glasson Dock, Coniston Lake and Morecambe, the latter related to next week’s post.

Their kite fest, as you see from the pics is amazing!

 

 

Don’t Go into The Cellar Expereince and The Canterville Ghost

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Still from Poet’s film Adieu with Love

A regular post will follow soon.

This week was interrupted by having to travel to Manchester on a work-related trip with a funereal theme – coffins!

It had a flavour of Don’t Go into the Cellar about it, the theatre prodution company that offers Victorian theatre with bite!

Through them I met Oscar Wilde as theatre show host a.k.a. Mr Jonathan Goodwin the director and producer.

They will be back in Cumbria soon with a production of The Canterville Ghost.

Wilde Screenplay, North-west Nugget (UK)

Here is an update on the present project-a film of Wilde’s poem Garden of Eros.

The characters are the Lover and Beloved, her lovestruck swain.

The idea is that they will move to a Voice Over.

I first studied screenwriting with The Arvon Foundation, gaining a bursery to do so.  It was near a place called Sheepwash in Devon.  The course was superb.  Centres are all over the United Kingdom.  More can be found on https://www.arvon.org/course/.

Ms Lucy Scher and Mr Paul Fraser were my tutors.

Raindance taught me about film production.

For their courses see https://www.raindance.org/courses/.

They also run a film festival.  Details are on https://www.raindance.org/festival/.

Their courses are excellent value for money and recommended!

Mr Ray Turner Director of Photography on most of my films has given permission to thank him for designing my logo since my initial post.

For more about him see http://www.lancastervideo.co.uk/.  He was instrumental in establishing Lancaster Film Makers’ Co-op.   For more about us see our YouTube link.

 

 

 

 

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My Logo

Swallows and Amazons in Yorkshire

 

 

 

 

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As Oscar Wilde has dominated recent posts it’s back to nature this week!

Sunday, 3rd June was the perfect day to catch up with The Arthur Ransome Experience!

Barbon Fell is a delightful place for this!   It offers a true taste of pastoral England untouched by time!

It awakened a nostalgia for childhood and memories of placing stones across the water to create a pathway over the stream!  I must have been about five years old at the time!

The Walkers and Blackett’s would love it!

Here are slides of a truly wonderful day and a magical landscape for you to enjoy!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An Oscar for you!

 

 

 

The Event: A Rehearsed Reading

Title: Oscar’s People

Date: May 25th

Venue: Club for Acts and Actors, Bedford Street, Covent Garden, London

Writer/Director: Neil Titley

Production and Publicity: Vanessa Heron

It was the perfect way to spend Bank Holiday.

Thanks to being a member of The Oscar Wilde Society I had the pleasure of attending this sparkling evening of entertainment  full of wit and laughter along with my friend Mrs Jenia Greenwood, also an actor.

A vibrant cast provided delightful portraits of those who had known Oscar Wilde during his life.

Mr Darcy Sullivan played the painter James Whistler, Mr Robert Duncan the actor-manager Sir Herbert Beerbohm Tree, Mr Bill Bingham Oscar Wilde, Mr Paddy O’Keefe George Bernard Shaw and Mr Titley the waiter as Mr Martin Nichols was ill.

It was lovely meeting members of The Oscar Wilde Society and members of the cast afterwards in the bar upstairs.

For more about The Oscar Wilde Society see http://oscarwildesociety.co.uk/.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Strictly for the Birds!

 

 

This week I visited the local RSPB Centre near Silverdale, which has nature trails close by that are the delight of visitors and locals alike.

Unquestionably Arthur Ransome would have been at home here!

I asked about the birds mentioned in Wilde’s summer poem Garden of Eros.

Much of the wildlife and feathered friends mentioned were available now or in June.

No lovers have materialised yet, but it would be wonderful to capture the idyllic settings of the Lancashire summer in a voice-over.

Grim up north?  What on earth do you mean?

Read Swallows and Amazons, folks!

Even better, visit Silverdale!

 

J S Bach: Ransome and Wilde in Moonlight

 

 

 

The news today is that the recording of Bach’s Prelude Number One went like a dream and is there on the new Moonlight page to add a new dimension to this site.

Mr Ray Turner of Lancaster Film Makers’ Co-op kindly filmed this video, had it ready for today and took the photographs, creating a special moonlight effect so a big thank you goes to him.

You will notice if you visit the new page that Bach’s magnificent piece of music  has a ripple effect like running water and seems so appropriate to represent the streams, lakes and rivers of the Lake District that Arthur Ransome loved so much and the life on the ocean wave or river lifestyle that was so central to him as a man.

It is also appropriate to the amazing characters in his novels and their adventures.

Yet we must not forget that Wilde also was a keen sailor.  He visited the Worthing regatta a year before his disastrous trials and enjoyed trips on the water.

Bach’s masterpiece also reflects the mood of the age in which these writers lived, its triumphs and tragedies.

http://www.arthur-ransome.org.uk/

http://oscarwildesociety.co.uk/