Swallows and Amazons 1974 Film

 

It was wonderful to meet TARS members and some of the team who worked on the 1974 film of Swallows and Amazons on Saturday, 28th July at The Alhambra Cinema Keswick.

The Arthur Ransome Society President Sophie Neville gave a charming talk before the film, which added a little extra magic to the event.

She played the part of tomboy Titty Walker, displaying a lovely combination of vulnerability, exuberance and imagination that were entirely natural.

All the cast were magnificent.

It was especially lovely to see the amazing Zannah Hamilton when she was in the first blush of youth as a resilient and capable Susan Walker.

The late Claude Whatham who directed the movie showed exceptional mastery in the way he drew out comedy from this gentle period piece based on Arthur Ransome’s most famous novel.

His work was thoroughly complimented by orchestral music which matched the mood and followed every beat of a superb screenplay.

Afterwards the President of the Society signed her books for Arthur Ransome fans who attended the screening.  These included delighted children who had thoroughly enjoyed themselves on an uncompromisingly rainy afternoon!

One of her books is The Secrets of Filming Swallows and Amazons.  The Kindle version is extremely engaging with its video trailer of this work containing behind the scenes footage that happened as the film was in production.

To join TARS see http://www.arthur-ransome.org.uk/.

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Click the link for more about Poet.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gyles Brandreth President of The Oscar Wilde Society in Conversation with Poet

Oscar was a sailor!

Here is a fabulous update from Mr John Cooper.

Sailing was a large part of Wilde’s summer holiday in 1882!  He enjoyed a large amount of time, (several days) on Robert Rossevelt’s yacht “Heart’s Ease.”

It is a name very much appropriate to  both writers Arthur and Oscar!

It is also absolutely brilliant to know that another writer  connects Ransome to Wilde!

Thank you Mr John Cooper for sharing your information with Poet Speak!

WordPress does after all, connect people from round the world!

 

 

 

 

Mr Gyles Brandreth, wit, novelist and President of The Oscar Wilde Society in conversation with Poet at The Platform in Morecambe before his current show
Break a Leg.

See http://oscarwildesociety.co.uk/

http://www.arthur-ransome.org.uk/

https://oscarwildeinamerica.blog

http://www.oscarwildeinamerica.org/quotations/nothing-to-declare.html.

 

 

 

 

 

 

An Oscar for you!

 

 

 

The Event: A Rehearsed Reading

Title: Oscar’s People

Date: May 25th

Venue: Club for Acts and Actors, Bedford Street, Covent Garden, London

Writer/Director: Neil Titley

Production and Publicity: Vanessa Heron

It was the perfect way to spend Bank Holiday.

Thanks to being a member of The Oscar Wilde Society I had the pleasure of attending this sparkling evening of entertainment  full of wit and laughter along with my friend Mrs Jenia Greenwood, also an actor.

A vibrant cast provided delightful portraits of those who had known Oscar Wilde during his life.

Mr Darcy Sullivan played the painter James Whistler, Mr Robert Duncan the actor-manager Sir Herbert Beerbohm Tree, Mr Bill Bingham Oscar Wilde, Mr Paddy O’Keefe George Bernard Shaw and Mr Titley the waiter as Mr Martin Nichols was ill.

It was lovely meeting members of The Oscar Wilde Society and members of the cast afterwards in the bar upstairs.

For more about The Oscar Wilde Society see http://oscarwildesociety.co.uk/.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Morecambe Bay Brilliance!

Just click the link!

It was great being able to write something about my home town as a guest blogger!

Here are the reasons you should come to Morecambe – and yes the author links are there including a celebrity!

The response to my post has been wonderful so it may as well be included here!

Thanks so much Mr Mohamad Al Karbi and to Morecambe Tourist Service for the pics!

All the best

Poet

Anne Gaelan 3_preview

 

 

 

 

Oscar and Arthur Detective Masters!

Anne Gaelan with Gyles Brandreth

Location: Chester Cathedral June 2017 Mr Brandreth very kindly autographed the Reading Gaol and Candlelight Murders.

The President of The Oscar Wilde Society Mr Gyles Brandreth has surely made Wilde in the twenty-first century with his Oscar Wilde murder mystery books.
In these books Wilde turns amateur sleuth and solves crimes along with Conan Doyle!
Entertaining, witty and eminently readable, they capture the essence of Wilde.
Mr Brandreth will be at The Platform in Morecambe in July this year.

 

 

 

Oscar Wilde and the Solstice Symbol

As the summer solstice approaches, Oscar Wilde’s work is currently in vogue big time and is in the midst of a deserved major revival in contemporary theatre and on film!

Next month a film The Happy Prince, will be released, a passion project for actor Rupert Everett for over a decade and reflected on BBC1’s Imagine on Sunday night.

We should surely also remember the winter solstice, a time when the moon is of central importance and which plays a significant part in Wilde’s work.

It certainly is in his play Salome, which Al Pacino turned into a superb film in which Jessica Chastain gave a tour de force performance in the tragic central role.

However, many are not used to thinking of Wilde as a poet, which is a shame as he was a very fine poet.

The moon often makes its appearance in his eloquent verses.

As an example why not take a look at his poem Endymion, subtitled  (to Music)?

 

 

 

FBTwittermoonjpg

 

A Review of The Making of Swallows and Amazons (1974) by Anne Gaelan

 

 

Photos are used with the kind consent of the author.

The Arthur Ransome Society

This uplifting memoir by Sophie Neville tells us how a schoolgirl’s life was transformed by unexpectedly starring in a major film adaptation of the world famous classic tale by Arthur Ransome.

A minor role as author Laurie Lee’s childhood sweetheart led to her winning the role of Ransome’s much-loved tomboy Titty Walker.

Interspersed with the narrative are charming diary entries twelve-year-old Sophie made of her day-to-day experiences.

The book captures the demanding work required of child actors and the additional pressures they faced of discomfort and school work.

The narrative also opens a window onto the detailed process of film making and the many  skills involved.  Photographs include examples of call sheets.

However, the book’s greatest asset is how it communicates a sense of camaraderie between players and crew.

In a profession notorious for back-stabbing it is refreshing to read how such a community worked with mutual respect for each other on a highly commercial enterprise.  Claude Whatham, the director particularly comes across as a kindly and empathetic influence.

This production you feel had heart and its success was deserved.

This work is a treat with an afterward not to be missed!