Gyles Brandreth President of The Oscar Wilde Society in Conversation with Poet

Oscar was a sailor!

Here is a fabulous update from Mr John Cooper.

Sailing was a large part of Wilde’s summer holiday in 1882!  He enjoyed a large amount of time, (several days) on Robert Rossevelt’s yacht “Heart’s Ease.”

It is a name very much appropriate to  both writers Arthur and Oscar!

It is also absolutely brilliant to know that another writer  connects Ransome to Wilde!

Thank you Mr John Cooper for sharing your information with Poet Speak!

WordPress does after all, connect people from round the world!

 

 

 

 

Mr Gyles Brandreth, wit, novelist and President of The Oscar Wilde Society in conversation with Poet at The Platform in Morecambe before his current show
Break a Leg.

See http://oscarwildesociety.co.uk/

http://www.arthur-ransome.org.uk/

https://oscarwildeinamerica.blog

http://www.oscarwildeinamerica.org/quotations/nothing-to-declare.html.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Don’t Go into The Cellar Expereince and The Canterville Ghost

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Still from Poet’s film Adieu with Love

A regular post will follow soon.

This week was interrupted by having to travel to Manchester on a work-related trip with a funereal theme – coffins!

It had a flavour of Don’t Go into the Cellar about it, the theatre prodution company that offers Victorian theatre with bite!

Through them I met Oscar Wilde as theatre show host a.k.a. Mr Jonathan Goodwin the director and producer.

They will be back in Cumbria soon with a production of The Canterville Ghost.

Wilde Screenplay, North-west Nugget (UK)

Here is an update on the present project-a film of Wilde’s poem Garden of Eros.

The characters are the Lover and Beloved, her lovestruck swain.

The idea is that they will move to a Voice Over.

I first studied screenwriting with The Arvon Foundation, gaining a bursery to do so.  It was near a place called Sheepwash in Devon.  The course was superb.  Centres are all over the United Kingdom.  More can be found on https://www.arvon.org/course/.

Ms Lucy Scher and Mr Paul Fraser were my tutors.

Raindance taught me about film production.

For their courses see https://www.raindance.org/courses/.

They also run a film festival.  Details are on https://www.raindance.org/festival/.

Their courses are excellent value for money and recommended!

Mr Ray Turner Director of Photography on most of my films has given permission to thank him for designing my logo since my initial post.

For more about him see http://www.lancastervideo.co.uk/.  He was instrumental in establishing Lancaster Film Makers’ Co-op.   For more about us see our YouTube link.

 

 

 

 

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My Logo

An Oscar for you!

 

 

 

The Event: A Rehearsed Reading

Title: Oscar’s People

Date: May 25th

Venue: Club for Acts and Actors, Bedford Street, Covent Garden, London

Writer/Director: Neil Titley

Production and Publicity: Vanessa Heron

It was the perfect way to spend Bank Holiday.

Thanks to being a member of The Oscar Wilde Society I had the pleasure of attending this sparkling evening of entertainment  full of wit and laughter along with my friend Mrs Jenia Greenwood, also an actor.

A vibrant cast provided delightful portraits of those who had known Oscar Wilde during his life.

Mr Darcy Sullivan played the painter James Whistler, Mr Robert Duncan the actor-manager Sir Herbert Beerbohm Tree, Mr Bill Bingham Oscar Wilde, Mr Paddy O’Keefe George Bernard Shaw and Mr Titley the waiter as Mr Martin Nichols was ill.

It was lovely meeting members of The Oscar Wilde Society and members of the cast afterwards in the bar upstairs.

For more about The Oscar Wilde Society see http://oscarwildesociety.co.uk/.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lady Windermere’s Fan

 

 

 

 

There is something of a Wilde revival in London at the present time, which immediately conjures up the image of witty plays with wealthy characters in who offer much-needed laughter to an audience in these troubled times.

Wilde afficionados in England’s capital are sure to be fulfilled this chilly March.

This current production of  Wilde’s sparkling comedy by the company Classic Spring is at the Vaudeville Theatre in London and playing to brilliant reviews with the superb Jennifer Saunders and Samantha Spiro in the lead female roles.

It was Wilde’s first great success when he began to taste the nectar of fortune in addition to fame.

Wilde found it difficult to get into this play the reason for which can be found in Arthur Ransome’s Oscar Wilde: A Critical Study.

It is a work well worth chasing up at your library as it shows superb insight that matches Richard Ellmann’s masterpiece which came out in 1987.

 

 

 

 

 

Something’s Cooking!

In Vera or The Nihilists, Wilde’s play set in Russia, (the country which so enchanted Arthur Ransome),  Prince Paul says,

“Culture depends on cookery.”

 

Arthur Ransome also liked to make a reference to the culinary in his series of novels.

Readers must look forward to reading about Susan Walker’s efforts in the great outdoors!

Cookery also has an important part to play in literature!

Since I joined TARS, members have made the most wonderful cake creations and it has been a source of joy reading about them.

Cookery also has an important part to play in literature!

Above is an Arthur Ransome themed Pirate Fortress Cake with Chocolate Coins that is easy to make.

Let us wonder what an Oscar Wilde themed cake would look like.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oscar Wilde and the Solstice Symbol

As the summer solstice approaches, Oscar Wilde’s work is currently in vogue big time and is in the midst of a deserved major revival in contemporary theatre and on film!

Next month a film The Happy Prince, will be released, a passion project for actor Rupert Everett for over a decade and reflected on BBC1’s Imagine on Sunday night.

We should surely also remember the winter solstice, a time when the moon is of central importance and which plays a significant part in Wilde’s work.

It certainly is in his play Salome, which Al Pacino turned into a superb film in which Jessica Chastain gave a tour de force performance in the tragic central role.

However, many are not used to thinking of Wilde as a poet, which is a shame as he was a very fine poet.

The moon often makes its appearance in his eloquent verses.

As an example why not take a look at his poem Endymion, subtitled  (to Music)?

 

 

 

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A Review of The Making of Swallows and Amazons (1974) by Anne Gaelan

 

 

Photos are used with the kind consent of the author.

The Arthur Ransome Society

This uplifting memoir by Sophie Neville tells us how a schoolgirl’s life was transformed by unexpectedly starring in a major film adaptation of the world famous classic tale by Arthur Ransome.

A minor role as author Laurie Lee’s childhood sweetheart led to her winning the role of Ransome’s much-loved tomboy Titty Walker.

Interspersed with the narrative are charming diary entries twelve-year-old Sophie made of her day-to-day experiences.

The book captures the demanding work required of child actors and the additional pressures they faced of discomfort and school work.

The narrative also opens a window onto the detailed process of film making and the many  skills involved.  Photographs include examples of call sheets.

However, the book’s greatest asset is how it communicates a sense of camaraderie between players and crew.

In a profession notorious for back-stabbing it is refreshing to read how such a community worked with mutual respect for each other on a highly commercial enterprise.  Claude Whatham, the director particularly comes across as a kindly and empathetic influence.

This production you feel had heart and its success was deserved.

This work is a treat with an afterward not to be missed!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Theatre: Tea with Oscar Wilde

Venue: The Heron Theatre, Beetham, Cumbria

Date: Friday, 7th April

Wilde would have made a great chat show host and materialises as this in the production I attended by the Birmingham based production company Don’t Go Into the Cellar.

Written by actor-playwright Jonathan Goodwin who plays Wilde, the show uses the same format in the first and second half which includes audience interaction.

Mr Goodwin, sweeping onto the stage  in a green velvet jacket and flowing cloak was every inch the gypsy academic of Arthur Ransome’s description in his bestselling book  Oscar Wilde, a Critical Study.

Sali Graham as music hall legend Marie Lloyd was the perfect guest for Wilde, displaying an earthy warmth in an energetic performance bubbling with humour laced with innuendo.

Her cockney sparrow chatter interspersed wth old music hall favourite songs which she  invited the audience to join in added an air of insouciance to the evening appropriate to the spirit of the stage host.

It was  unfortunate the songs are so old that the audience  were unable to rouse the atmosphere a notch as they did not know the words.

Nevertheless it all contributed to a sense of relaxation  appropriate to the chat-show setting and engagingly tiny theatre.

In the second half I found myself invited onto the stage to perform simple actions with “Miss Lloyd” which gave a delightful flavour of old music hall fare.

The bite which the company promises was in the adapted stories of Wilde read by Mr Goodwin.  At the end of The Happy Prince I was wiping away tears. The second story he performed was The Nightingale and the Rose.

Wilde’s masterpieces brought home the inequity, vacuous social matching and heartless materialism at the centre of Victorian England and Wilde’s recognition of the need for social change.

It was a charming evening whcih cut through to a darker world beyond the sparkle.

The ending is not to be missed.


 

 

 

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Arthur and Oscar

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The Arthur Ransome Society    

The Oscar Wilde Society

Did you know there was a connection between both these writers?  Why not explore this site?

It is particularly relevant in the face of the recent revival of both authors’ works!

Let’s celebrate their wonderful legacy!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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