Oscar Wilde and the Solstice Symbol

As the summer solstice approaches, Oscar Wilde’s work is currently in vogue big time and is in the midst of a deserved major revival in contemporary theatre and on film!

Next month a film The Happy Prince, will be released, a passion project for actor Rupert Everett for over a decade and reflected on BBC1’s Imagine on Sunday night.

We should surely also remember the winter solstice, a time when the moon is of central importance and which plays a significant part in Wilde’s work.

It certainly is in his play Salome, which Al Pacino turned into a superb film in which Jessica Chastain gave a tour de force performance in the tragic central role.

However, many are not used to thinking of Wilde as a poet, which is a shame as he was a very fine poet.

The moon often makes its appearance in his eloquent verses.

As an example why not take a look at his poem Endymion, subtitled  (to Music)?

 

 

 

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Bank Holiday News

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I am unexpectedly off to London on business and to see the work of Mr Neil Titley who has played Oscar Wilde round the world!

I am looking forward to meeting members of The Oscar Wilde Society and of course (hopefully) Mr Titley!

It would also be nice to try and catch up with members of The Arthur Ransome Society in London.

There is also news on the film of an excerpt of Wilde’s poem Garden of Eros.

The person playing the part of the Narrator (the Lover) is the delightful, beautiful Miss G who has a talent for acting and is also a musician who writes her own songs.

This is so appropriate for a poet whom Arthur Ransome recognised as a Gypsy academic whose poetic works had a proximity to folk song.

Now there is the search for  a swain!  He will be the Beloved.

Have a wonderful Bank Holiday!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Strictly for the Birds!

 

 

This week I visited the local RSPB Centre near Silverdale, which has nature trails close by that are the delight of visitors and locals alike.

Unquestionably Arthur Ransome would have been at home here!

I asked about the birds mentioned in Wilde’s summer poem Garden of Eros.

Much of the wildlife and feathered friends mentioned were available now or in June.

No lovers have materialised yet, but it would be wonderful to capture the idyllic settings of the Lancashire summer in a voice-over.

Grim up north?  What on earth do you mean?

Read Swallows and Amazons, folks!

Even better, visit Silverdale!

 

Morecambe Bay Brilliance!

Just click the link!

It was great being able to write something about my home town as a guest blogger!

Here are the reasons you should come to Morecambe – and yes the author links are there including a celebrity!

The response to my post has been wonderful so it may as well be included here!

Thanks so much Mr Mohamad Al Karbi and to Morecambe Tourist Service for the pics!

All the best

Poet

Anne Gaelan 3_preview

 

 

 

 

Search for Lovers in the Magic Garden

 

 

 

Hello again!  

Here are some photos to greet the music of May!

My search is still in progress for people to play young lovers to illustrate Oscar Wilde’s poem Garden of Eros on screen.

I have, like many a film maker seen the perfect pair, just the right age; visions of loveliness indeed and literally in youth’s first bloom.

Thinking of them, I want to storyboard it.

Alas, I am not too hopeful!  If only……..!!

Apart from that I am developing a writing piece about – you have guessed it – Oscar and Arthur!

Have any other film makers had this experience?

That’s all for now and I hope you enjoy this post.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wilde Film Project in Ransome Setting

 

 

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Poet requires:

Two people (18+) to play the parts of  lovers in a pastoral setting for a short film.
TextWilde’s Garden of Eros as Voice-Over.
The proposed film will have movement with room for a few dance moves.
Costume will have Victorian period and Wildean pre-Raphaelite suggestion.
A favoured location is the Silverdale area of Lancashire an area Arthur Ransome would have loved and an area of great beauty, also a bird lover’s paradise.
Filming will take place in the early morning.
Refreshments will be available.
As Mr Rupert Everett’s film The Happy Prince is about to be released it would be wonderful to have a film for you which evokes the true magic of Wilde the poet.
For now, hopefully the slides above will evoke the true magic of an English garden in summer and the beauty of wild Lancashire.
Enjoy.

 

 

The Quantum Poet at Golborne Library

 

 

 

Do you remember Mr Dean Fraser, a.k.a. the Quantum Poet who took part in Wilde Reflections, a show in Garstang, Lancashire, UK in January 2018?

Mr Fraser has a lot of time for Arthur Ransome as he is of Gypsy heritage himself and like Ransome has a great respect for nature which is evident in his poetry.

On Thursday, April 12th 2018 we caught up with each other at Golborne library in south Lancashire in the UK.

It was so good to be at a library with free parking!

At his event he commented that all good music is poetry.

As you are aware PoetSpeak challenges the popular notion that music and musicality have no significant role in Oscar Wilde’s work.

The comment was most welcome!

After the show it was nice to stop in The Queen Anne pub for light refreshments.  It was a very clean establishment.

For a full review of his presentation at which the poet read a selection from his books click the link below.

Mr Dean Fraser at Golborne

 

 

Chopin’s Charm finds a Wilde Connection

 

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After playing Chopin, I feel as if I had been weeping over sins that I had never committed, and mourning over tragedies that were not my own.” Gilbert, The Critic as Artist Part I

Polish maestro Frederik Chopin slips into more than one of Oscar Wilde’s works.

The significance of this surely traces back to Wilde’s brother Willie, an accomplished and talented pianist with a particular love of Chopin as Ellmann notes in his celebrated biography Oscar Wilde.

Chopin wrote plenty of nocturnes, traditionally associated with night music, like his charming Nocturne in F Minor which is traditionally associated with night, but his famous Prelude in E Minor captures more the elements of Gilbert’s statement.

Chopin’s Opus 28 No. 4 is suitable for a Moonlight page.